In Print

Art and Antiques, Feb. 2007

Florida Design's Art Galleries and Fine Antiques Volume 1, page 113 Winter 2007

San Marco magazine, Summer 2001

Orlando Arts, Sept.- Oct. 2002

Orlando Arts, Sept. - Oct. 2003

Coastal Living Magazine, Oct. 2004

Arbus Magazine, March/April 2004

The Legacy Magazine, 2005 "Home is Where the Heart Is," by David Raterman

FL Design Vol 15, No. 4, 2005

FL Design November 2006

The Sanford Herald,October 11, 2006 1c-2c View here

Reviews

Works by Laura Lacambra Shubert
Monty Stabler Galleries, 1811 29th Ave. South. Through Feb 2, 2002

Laura Lacambra Shubert uses paint with the pleasure of a dessert chef spreading frosting on a cake.

Her paintings are almost monochromatic, high key exercises in capturing dappled or shimmering light over inanimate objects. Pieces of furniture in sparse, large spaces stick in the viscosity of pigment, locked in as the sunlight plays about in pensive warmth.

A few outdoor scenes capture time like a sundial, the light and shadows varying in tone and intensity as they play over architectural surfaces.

These paintings are simple, direct, rich and lush. As visual panaceas, they demand little from the viewer and offer a quiet haven for the stressed.


James R. Nelson is visual arts critic for the Birmingham News.

Lacambra-Shubert paintings exude bravura and the good life
Recent Works by Laura Lacambra-Shubert. Monty Stabler Galleries. Through Jan. 31.
Review Birmingham Show 1-04

A promising young artist, Laura Lacambra-Shubert, paints in a bravura style filled with tactile energy. Her ability to catch the effects of light and her concentration on pattern relationships is masterful. A willingness to sacrifice detail without loss of descriptive content recalls the brush work of Edouard Manet and the defining textural realism of Wayne Thiebaud.

This exhibition is dominated by studies of figures, usually waiters or chefs. She eliminates individuality by painting torsos beginning at the neck and ending above the knees. This enables her to integrate the figure into her work as part of a pattern of colors, textures and shapes. The assertive boldness of her compositions is both sophisticated and matter of fact. A woman tying her apron, waiters carrying wine and glasses and still lifes of wine bottles are treated with functional anonymity that the viewer recognizes as true and accurate. Lacambra-Shubert's street views show building facades dappled with the pale light of morning or the strong contrasting light of late afternoon. Something as simple as two bottles of wine lying on a white cloth achieve the impact of two cannons lying in snow. Her fascination with the art of gracious living focuses on the idea of food and wine. These are paintings that convey a sense of well being, of the good life and of deep and quiet pleasures. It is good to see works by a painter who loves and respects what paint can do in describing what is worth studying for pure pleasure.


01/18/04, Arts Columnist James R. Nelson